25
Jan
10

The Crystal Palace


Architect Joseph Paxton
Location London, England (then Sydenham)
Date 1851, moved 1852, burnt 1936
Building Type exposition hall
Construction System cast iron and glass
Climate temperate
Context exposition campus
Style Victorian
Notes Modular construction system – prefabricated iron sections. Floor area of 770,000 sq ft.,1851 ft long, 450 ft wide.

The Crystal Palace was a cast-iron and glass building originally erected in Hyde Park, London, England, to house the Great Exhibition of 1851. More than 14,000 exhibitors from around the world gathered in the Palace’s 990,000 square feet (92,000 m2) of exhibition space to display examples of the latest technology developed in the Industrial Revolution. Designed by Joseph Paxton, the Great Exhibition building was 1,851 feet (564 m) long, with an interior height of 108 feet (33 m).[1]

After the exhibition, the building was moved to a new park in a high, healthy and affluent area of London called Sydenham Hill, an area not much changed today from the well-heeled suburb full of large villas that it was during its Victorian heyday. The Crystal Palace was enlarged and stood in the area from 1854 to 1936, when it was destroyed by fire. It attracted many thousands of visitors from all levels of society. The name Crystal Palace (the satirical magazine Punch usually gets the credit for coining the phrase)[2] was later used to denote this area of south London and the park that surrounds the site, home of the Crystal Palace National Sports Centre.

Text from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Crystal_Palace, http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Crystal_Palace.html

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