22
Jan
10

Eero Sarrinen

Eero Saarinen
(b. Kirkkonummi, Finland 1910; d. Ann Arbor, Michigan 1961)

Eero Saarinen was born in Kirkkonummi, Finland in 1910. He studied in Paris and at Yale University, after which he joined his father’s practice. Eero initially pursued sculpture as his art of choice. After a year in art school, he decided to become an architect instead. Much of his work shows a relation to sculpture.

Saarinen developed a remarkable range which depended on color, form and materials. Saarinen showed a marked dependence on innovative structures and sculptural forms, but not at the cost of pragmatic considerations. He easily moved back and forth between the International Style and Expressionism, utilizing a vocabulary of curves and cantilevered forms.

A list of his works include:
Berkshire Music Shed, at Tanglewood, Massachusetts, 1940.
Dulles Airport, at Chantilly, Virginia, 1958 to 1962.
Gateway Arch, at St. Louis, Missouri, 1947 competition, construction 1961 to 1966.
General Motors Technical Center, at Warren, Michigan, 1946 to 1955.
IBM Research Building, at Yorktown, New York, 1957 to 1961.
John Deere and Company, at Moline, Illinois, 1963.
Kresge Auditorium, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1950 to 1955.
Kresge Chapel, at Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1955.
North Christian Church, at Columbus, Indiana, 1959 to 1963.
TWA at New York, at New York, New York, 1956 to 1962.
Yale Hockey Rink, at New Haven, Connecticut, 1956 to 1958

Text from: http://www.greatbuildings.com/architects/Eero_Saarinen.html

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